At peace with Latrice

Lord jesus where is jesus I need him to sop me up right now

166 notes

imvrane:

asksecularwitch:

thewatchfulwinterwitch:

asksecularwitch:

thewatchfulwinterwitch:

upthewitchypunx:

Study your herbs, friends: A cautionary tale.
So, I have a friend who was visiting from out of town and I was afraid I was going to be out of the house when they left. I came back home to find a lovely note and this sitting on my dining room table. Right away I knew this was wrong. That’s not yarrow, that’s Queen Anne’s Lace.
Then my friend came back to the house right before leaving for the airport and I was like “um, thanks for the sweet gift. however, that’s not what you think it is.” She said she thought they were yarrow and she gathered them by the house and we talked it out. She really thought she was doing the right thing but she’s not from this region. Then we joked about how in the future we can laugh about how she tried to kill me.
A yarrow tincture could be good for reducing fevers or for colds in general. However, what she made me was  vat of birth control. Um, thanks!?
Seriously folks, double triple, quadruple check and cross reference your herbs, especially if you are going to giving them to other people.

Not only birth control -  I believe and can do all sorts of nasty shit in the wrong quantities, yikes!! 

Wait. I didn’t realize queen anne’s lace could be used for birth control!?!
All I know about that plant [I can recognize it] is that it’s good for dying and drying. It’ll retain colors very well, as long as you put the flowers down on a flat surface after dying them. 
Why do I know this?
Mom’s a dried flower arranger. Or at least she was. 

Its not really strictly a birth control, it’s an abortificient so it’s not really something you could safely use as a regular birth control, especially because the quantities are really sketchy.
Local folklore says that if you bring it in the house, bad luck will happen and it can cause your mother to die - hence, it causes miscarriage so it “kills” mothers.

All I have to say is wat.

okayyyyy— Info time! Queen Anne’s lace is not an abortifacient.
Traditionally it’s used like a birth control pill taken the morning after. It’s usually classified as an emmenogogue- an herb the brings on menstruation.  It prevents implantation, etc, by doing so. Though it has the potential to cause abortion, (It can cause uterine contractions, so it is definitely not something to consume while -happily- pregnant!!!)  that would have been a much less common use. It’s generally too mild to disrupt a well established pregnancy. (unless the subject is very sensitive or it is combined with other, more toxic herbs like pennyroyal. Please NEVER INGEST PENNYROYAL ESSENTIAL OIL. It is highly toxic and even small doses can result in serious illness or death. As a tea it is much safer, albeit still in small doses. Pennyroyal is both an emmenogogue and an abortifacient.)
Herbs used to induce abortion are generally toxic, and are extremely dangerous if not used properly, as well as the usual danger that an individual may have an unusual or allergic reaction to a certain herb.
While they can still be dangerous, and should only be used after copious research and investigation (as well as triple checking that you are in fact holding the right plant, like the horrifying possibility of confusing QAL and water hemlock ) they’re in a different category than most herbs that can be classified as abortifacients.
tl;dr, plants have lots of risk and you should always do thorough research and identification, but putting mostly harmless plants in a category that’s mostly toxic feeds many people’s fear of natural remedies, which makes me sad.
also Queen Anne’s lace is a rad plant. 

imvrane:

asksecularwitch:

thewatchfulwinterwitch:

asksecularwitch:

thewatchfulwinterwitch:

upthewitchypunx:

Study your herbs, friends: A cautionary tale.

So, I have a friend who was visiting from out of town and I was afraid I was going to be out of the house when they left. I came back home to find a lovely note and this sitting on my dining room table. Right away I knew this was wrong. That’s not yarrow, that’s Queen Anne’s Lace.

Then my friend came back to the house right before leaving for the airport and I was like “um, thanks for the sweet gift. however, that’s not what you think it is.” She said she thought they were yarrow and she gathered them by the house and we talked it out. She really thought she was doing the right thing but she’s not from this region. Then we joked about how in the future we can laugh about how she tried to kill me.

A yarrow tincture could be good for reducing fevers or for colds in general. However, what she made me was  vat of birth control. Um, thanks!?

Seriously folks, double triple, quadruple check and cross reference your herbs, especially if you are going to giving them to other people.

Not only birth control -  I believe and can do all sorts of nasty shit in the wrong quantities, yikes!! 

Wait. I didn’t realize queen anne’s lace could be used for birth control!?!

All I know about that plant [I can recognize it] is that it’s good for dying and drying. It’ll retain colors very well, as long as you put the flowers down on a flat surface after dying them. 

Why do I know this?

Mom’s a dried flower arranger. Or at least she was. 

Its not really strictly a birth control, it’s an abortificient so it’s not really something you could safely use as a regular birth control, especially because the quantities are really sketchy.

Local folklore says that if you bring it in the house, bad luck will happen and it can cause your mother to die - hence, it causes miscarriage so it “kills” mothers.

All I have to say is wat.

okayyyyy— Info time! Queen Anne’s lace is not an abortifacient.

Traditionally it’s used like a birth control pill taken the morning after. It’s usually classified as an emmenogogue- an herb the brings on menstruation.  It prevents implantation, etc, by doing so. Though it has the potential to cause abortion, (It can cause uterine contractions, so it is definitely not something to consume while -happily- pregnant!!!)  that would have been a much less common use. It’s generally too mild to disrupt a well established pregnancy. (unless the subject is very sensitive or it is combined with other, more toxic herbs like pennyroyal. Please NEVER INGEST PENNYROYAL ESSENTIAL OIL. It is highly toxic and even small doses can result in serious illness or death. As a tea it is much safer, albeit still in small doses. Pennyroyal is both an emmenogogue and an abortifacient.)

Herbs used to induce abortion are generally toxic, and are extremely dangerous if not used properly, as well as the usual danger that an individual may have an unusual or allergic reaction to a certain herb.

While they can still be dangerous, and should only be used after copious research and investigation (as well as triple checking that you are in fact holding the right plant, like the horrifying possibility of confusing QAL and water hemlock ) they’re in a different category than most herbs that can be classified as abortifacients.

tl;dr, plants have lots of risk and you should always do thorough research and identification, but putting mostly harmless plants in a category that’s mostly toxic feeds many people’s fear of natural remedies, which makes me sad.

also Queen Anne’s lace is a rad plant. 

(via mettallicanimechick)